Do you have what it takes to be a scientist?

New Hispanic Scientists for 2008

check it out: CLICK HERE

One way to think of energy is “the ability to do work.” Today, we use all different kinds of machines to do work… Cars to take us to where we want to go. Artificial hearts to pump our blood. Our world is full of amazing machines – all designed by scientists.

On these pages, you’ll find out about eleven Latino scientists who work in different ways with energy. Some of these scientists build giant wind turbines, others are searching for cures for cancer. Try these many games, experiments and activities to see if you have what it takes to be a star Latino scientist ...

Orlando Auciello
Materials Scientist,

Argonne National Laboratory

Orlando Auciello, an Argentine-born materials scientist and physicist, is working to develop an artificial retina (a part of the eye) to allow blind people to see. He is also at work on “smart cards” to make
medical bills and other business usually handled by paper a thing of the past. He says he came to the United States because freedom of expression is absolutely essential in order to be a good scientist.

Do your eyes play tricks on you?
Try this online game.
Ever wonder how the eyes work? Click here.

Challenge yourself: Hear Orlando Auciello talk about his work in Spanish (MP3 podcasts).

1. A Passionate Argentine
2. Two Marvels of Creation
3. Smart Cards
4. Miraculous Rays
5. From Argentina to Argonne


Need podcast translations in English? Click here.
Nathan Castro
Intern,
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Nathan Castro thought of becoming a doctor, but wasn’t sure exactly what he wanted to do. A biology teacher suggested that he pursue an internship at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

These days, Nathan can be found at the lab working to improve treatments for common injuries.

Want to perform a virtual knee surgery online?

Challenge yourself:
Hear Nathan Castro talk about his work in Spanish (MP3 podcasts).

1. It’s about Curiosity
2. A Teacher Made the Difference
3. Special Programs for Students


Need podcast translations in English?
Click here.

 
Miguel Contreras
Materials Scientist,
National Renewable Energy Laboratory

It’s hard to imagine that a top scientist like Miguel Contreras once stood on street corners selling handicrafts from his native Chile because he couldn’t land work as a scientist in this country. Today, he is a
leading expert in solar technology, helping us all to build a future of renewable energy sources. He and his team at the National Renewable Energy Lab developed a solar cell that currently holds the world record for effectively generating electricity from sunlight.

Speaking of solar power, how can you protect your skin from the power of the sun?

Design and test your own sunscreen online here.
Or, build your own solar hot-dog cooker.

Yahel De La Cruz
Systems Engineer,
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

When Yahel De La Cruz isn’t keeping the computer systems humming at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, she is busy recruiting the next generation of Latino scientists. In fact, this Mexican-American
engineer has created a movable lab to introduce young people to the world of science and engineering. “We bring a model or an experiment that they can participate in… and that seems to capture their attention a lot,” she explains.

Challenge yourself:
Hear Yahel De La Cruz talk about her work in Spanish (MP3 podcasts).

1. Total Efficiency
2. Going to Bat for Latinos
3. A Travelling Lab


For Podcast translations in English, Click here.

More Latino scientists, games and activities… Page 2 Page 3